IRREVOCABLE TRUSTS

 

What is an irrevocable trust?

An irrevocable trust is simply a trust with terms and provisions that cannot be changed by the grantor. This is distinguished from a revocable trust, which is commonly used in estate planning and allows the grantor to change the terms of the trust and/or take the property back at any time.

 

Why would I want to use an irrevocable trust?

Using an irrevocable trust allows you to minimize estate tax, protect assets from creditors, and provide for family members who are minors, financially irresponsible, or who have special needs.

 

How do I create an irrevocable trust?

To create a trust, the grantor enters into a written trust agreement. He or she names a trustee to hold the property according to the terms of this trust agreement. The trust agreement identifies the beneficiaries and tells the trustee when distributions of trust property (including the original assets placed in trust, as well as the income on such assets) should be made to the beneficiaries. A well drafted trust agreement should plan for certain contingencies, such as what to do if the initial beneficiaries are no longer living.

 
 

If you have any questions, or if you would like to set up an appointment, please contact Sandra Bonds Hickey, Esq. at (760) 729-2327.

The information in this article is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. This article is for informational purposes only and may or may not apply to you. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your particular circumstances. We invite you to contact us and welcome your calls, letters and electronic mail. Contacting us does not create an attorney-client relationship. Please do not send any confidential information to us until such time as an attorney-client relationship has been established.